The Tattoosday Book Review: Driven to Ink, A Tattoo Shop Mystery

Earlier this week, author Karen E. Olson released the third installment of her Tattoo Shop Mystery series, Driven To Ink.




For those readers who may not be familiar with Ms. Olson's series, you can check out my reviews of the first two books, here (The Missing Ink) and here (Pretty in Ink).

The series features Brett Kavanaugh, a Las Vegas-based tattoo artist, and a cast of supporting characters, from her police officer brother Tim, to fellow artist and competitor Jeff Coleman, owner of the shop Murder Ink. Kavanaugh's staff at The Painted Lady, a high-end tattoo shop at the Venetian Hotel and Casino, also offers up some memorable characters, including Bitsy, the diminuitive shop manager.

Driven To Ink, like its predecessors, has an "only in Las Vegas" feel, with a well-crafted narrative that, this time around, revolves around a drive-thru wedding chapel called "That's Amore" that features a handful of Dean Martin doppelgängers crooning, you guessed it, "That's Amore".


Olson has once again spun a riveting tale, which finds Brett Kavanaugh discovering a dead Dean Martin imperspnator in her trunk, with a tattoo machine's clip cord around the victim's neck. She had just lent her car, a Mustang Bullitt, to Jeff Coleman's octogenarian mother, Sylvia, so she could get married in style at the That's Amore chapel.

What I love about Karen Olson's books is that tattoos are seen above and beyond base clues in a murder mystery. She treats the vocation with utter respect, explaining things to the reader as if they were new to a tattoo studio. Tattoos may serve as clues, but they are not regarded as these huge totems that define their owners.

Brett Kavanaugh is an enjoyable protagonist, not without faults, and the author let's the reader tag along on her adventures that start off innocently enough, but pull her into deeper and deeper water. It's no surprise that one of the recurring characters is an Emergency Room doctor, as medical attention seems to be needed from time to time, making this mystery series ring truer than one in which the hero (or heroine) dances through their adventure unscathed.

Olson's first book in the series was a novelty. A new mystery with tattoos at the center of the narrative. After three volumes, Brett Kavanaugh seems more real, more human, than ever before.

A word to the skeptics, those tattoo snobs who may scoff at the light-hearted appearance of these books: Karen Olsen has given a gift to the tattoo community in the form of Brett Kavanaugh. Driven To Ink is another great mystery, with a respectful and honest portrayal of one artist/sleuth who just happens to be a tattoo shop owner.

I have enjoyed every one of Ms. Olson's books and Driven To Ink is yet another chapter in the fascinating life of Brett Kavanaugh. I'm looking forward to her next installment which, I am led to believe, is tentatively called Ink Flamingos.

Check out Karen talking about her first Tattoo Shop Mystery here:




new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower

new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower
new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower
new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower+jason beibernew rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower

new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower

new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower
new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower
new rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower+jason beibernew rose tattoo picture+tattoo design of rose flower

Orphans: Heather's Cowgirl

Here's another orphan post. I took the picture, got the name, a shred of info, and passed a flier. And even though I saw Heather, the host of the tattoo, a week later, walking by me one day in a hurry, I never got to the bottom of this tattoo. So it goes....



Heather credited this to an artist named "Joanne" with a long French name. Any guesses? Anyone?

Let's find this Orphan a home....

Orphans: A Native-American Sleeve on Seventh Avenue

A few weeks ago, I was walking up Seventh Avenue between 33rd and 34th Streets, when I spotted this peeking out of a guy's shirt sleeve:


I stopped to ask him about the tattoo. Or rather, asked him if I could take a picture, when he revealed that it was much larger than it appeared poking out of the sleeve on his left arm:


Sadly, I gave him the Tattoosday flier and asked him to e-mail me so we could discuss it further and he a) lost the flier or b) decided to forgo contacting me. So, I have no idea who he is, nor can I credit the artist, whose work is pretty darn impressive.


When this happens, I dub it an "orphan" post, but obviously, despite the lack of details, it's still worth sharing.


Thanks to the anonymous contributor who allowed me to take photos of this great tattoo and share it with us here on Tattoosday!

Gina Shares Two Works of Art by Mark Ryden

I wanted to start off the new week after the holiday by showing off some amazing tattoos that I was fortunate enough to encounter last week.

I met Gina in Penn Station and she offered up these beauties, which are tattooed in her ditches (inside of her elbows), in what many consider to be one of the more painful places to be inked:


There are two artists behind these tattoos. First is the painter Mark Ryden, upon whose work these tattoos were based. Next is the master craftsman Tim Kern, from Tribulation Tattoo, whose work appeared last on Tattoosday here.


No big story, just incredible body art.


Thanks to Gina for sharing these incredible tattoos with us here on Tattoosday!

Sarah's Chrysanthemum

I spotted this lovely flower on Sarah while she was waiting for her train in Penn Station:


This chrysanthemum is her first tattoo and sits on her upper left arm. Sarah is a big fan of Eastern art and understands that chrysanthemums are symbols of joy (except in Germany, she noted). She feels that Russell Kelley at Silk City Tattoo in Hawthorne, New Jersey did a nice job of merging Eastern and Old School styles on this beautiful flower. Work from Silk City has appeared multiple times before and can all be seen under Silk City's Tattoosday label here.

Thanks to Sarah for sharing her tattoo with us, and Happy Labor Day from us here at Tattoosday!

Hawai'i and Germany Meet Halfway in Manhattan

Last Sunday, I found myself unexpectedly in my weekday stomping grounds, outside of Penn Station. I saw a couple sitting on the steps in Penn Plaza and noticed the gentleman had a remarkable tattoo on his outer left calf.

We had a slight language barrier, as they were tourists from Europe. But Rico agreed to let me take the photo:


The tattoo was done by Tom at Stechwerk Tattoo Studio in Kempten, Germany.

Rico said he just liked the design and that Hawai'i is somewhere he hopes to visit one day. The surfboard and the archipelago outline are symbolic of our fiftieth state, and the yellow hibiscus is the state flower.


Danke schön to Rico for sharing this cool Hawai'i-themed tattoo with us here on Tattoosday!

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Writing Tattoos - Some Tips and Suggestions

Writing Tattoos are very popular and you have to agree that they do look very cool and interesting, however there is nothing worse than deciding on those words of inspiration and having them tattooed on your body in Chinese or Arabic writing etc only to be told later that the tattoo does not say what you think it does.

My very first suggestion therefore is to make sure you get a proper template prior to visiting the tattoo artist, if you have some saying or phrase he has never heard of and you want it as a wrist tattoo as a Chinese tattoo or an Arabic tattoo odds are the tattoo artist does not speak either of these languages nor does he know how to write them.

The trick of picking the same words from several designs just does not work and instead of something cool and personal and truly motivational you could end up with a pile of utter rubbish that makes no sense.

So do your home work and be prepared. Star tattoos are very popular and there is no danger here in a mistake here, as there are literally dozens of different designs. Again you should get the template and make sure you get the one you really like, after all its going to be there for a time.

Chinese tattoos are the most common but the language is anything but, with over 65,000 characters it is crucial that you get the correct translation. There are several different scripts used in Chinese Tattoos and a professional can ensure you utilise the correct one and provide an accurate template.

Arabic Tattoos are proving just as popular with a style of writing Calligraphy which can provide your inspiration saying in what looks like a landscaped picture. Arabic Tattoos can be designed to look like an abstract drawing and still translate accurately they can be like a work of art from Picasso. However it is a complex and difficult skill so again it is imperative that you get the correct translation and template to take along to the tattoo artist.

If done right it will look right and you will avoid the embarrassment of having utter nonsense written on your body so my main tip and suggestion has to be plan what you want, be very sure of the saying and then get a professional interpretation and template.

Tribal Tattoo Designs - All About Tribal Tattoos And How To Pick Best Tribal Tattoo Design for You

Tribal tattoo designs popularity have increased and went its way to modern tattooing since 1990. Tribal tattoos are simple yet striking because its simplicity is far more compelling than most of the other tattoos. These tattoos are generally composed of curvy bold strokes that are usually black in color but there are some lace-like lines that are intricately inked on the body.

Although tribal designs have increased in popularity, most people do not know much about it's history and symbolism. People rarely try to make an effort to learn about tattoos and look into the tribal cultures that used them as part of the heritage. Tribal designs can be traced back to many centuries ago and from almost all parts of the world. Initially, these tattoos have meaning and significance to the person's life, history or anything that is of relevance to him. Some of them used to have tattoos to indicate their achievements while some simply have them as adornments for their body.

It would be best for people who want to have tribal design marked on their skin should know more about its background or history as it will surely help them learn about the culture and the meaning behind it. Tribal Designs are common in Asian, African and Native American cultures. Knowing the background of the design one is interested in can help bring a connection with the culture where the it originated.

There are cases when you may not feel to have a connection with a particular design. If this happens, do not fret as you can incorporate several designs. You can work with your artist to create a design that will have a personal meaning to you. Your artist can also help suggest inspirations to help create your dream design.

Tribal Tattoo Designs - All About Tribal Tattoos And How To Pick Best Tribal Tattoo Design for You

Tribal tattoo designs popularity have increased and went its way to modern tattooing since 1990. Tribal tattoos are simple yet striking because its simplicity is far more compelling than most of the other tattoos. These tattoos are generally composed of curvy bold strokes that are usually black in color but there are some lace-like lines that are intricately inked on the body.

Although tribal designs have increased in popularity, most people do not know much about it's history and symbolism. People rarely try to make an effort to learn about tattoos and look into the tribal cultures that used them as part of the heritage. Tribal designs can be traced back to many centuries ago and from almost all parts of the world. Initially, these tattoos have meaning and significance to the person's life, history or anything that is of relevance to him. Some of them used to have tattoos to indicate their achievements while some simply have them as adornments for their body.

It would be best for people who want to have tribal design marked on their skin should know more about its background or history as it will surely help them learn about the culture and the meaning behind it. Tribal Designs are common in Asian, African and Native American cultures. Knowing the background of the design one is interested in can help bring a connection with the culture where the it originated.

There are cases when you may not feel to have a connection with a particular design. If this happens, do not fret as you can incorporate several designs. You can work with your artist to create a design that will have a personal meaning to you. Your artist can also help suggest inspirations to help create your dream design.

Tribal Tattoo Designs - All About Tribal Tattoos And How To Pick Best Tribal Tattoo Design for You

Tribal tattoo designs popularity have increased and went its way to modern tattooing since 1990. Tribal tattoos are simple yet striking because its simplicity is far more compelling than most of the other tattoos. These tattoos are generally composed of curvy bold strokes that are usually black in color but there are some lace-like lines that are intricately inked on the body.

Although tribal designs have increased in popularity, most people do not know much about it's history and symbolism. People rarely try to make an effort to learn about tattoos and look into the tribal cultures that used them as part of the heritage. Tribal designs can be traced back to many centuries ago and from almost all parts of the world. Initially, these tattoos have meaning and significance to the person's life, history or anything that is of relevance to him. Some of them used to have tattoos to indicate their achievements while some simply have them as adornments for their body.

It would be best for people who want to have tribal design marked on their skin should know more about its background or history as it will surely help them learn about the culture and the meaning behind it. Tribal Designs are common in Asian, African and Native American cultures. Knowing the background of the design one is interested in can help bring a connection with the culture where the it originated.

There are cases when you may not feel to have a connection with a particular design. If this happens, do not fret as you can incorporate several designs. You can work with your artist to create a design that will have a personal meaning to you. Your artist can also help suggest inspirations to help create your dream design.

Tribal Tattoo Designs - All About Tribal Tattoos And How To Pick Best Tribal Tattoo Design for You

Tribal tattoo designs popularity have increased and went its way to modern tattooing since 1990. Tribal tattoos are simple yet striking because its simplicity is far more compelling than most of the other tattoos. These tattoos are generally composed of curvy bold strokes that are usually black in color but there are some lace-like lines that are intricately inked on the body.

Although tribal designs have increased in popularity, most people do not know much about it's history and symbolism. People rarely try to make an effort to learn about tattoos and look into the tribal cultures that used them as part of the heritage. Tribal designs can be traced back to many centuries ago and from almost all parts of the world. Initially, these tattoos have meaning and significance to the person's life, history or anything that is of relevance to him. Some of them used to have tattoos to indicate their achievements while some simply have them as adornments for their body.

It would be best for people who want to have tribal design marked on their skin should know more about its background or history as it will surely help them learn about the culture and the meaning behind it. Tribal Designs are common in Asian, African and Native American cultures. Knowing the background of the design one is interested in can help bring a connection with the culture where the it originated.

There are cases when you may not feel to have a connection with a particular design. If this happens, do not fret as you can incorporate several designs. You can work with your artist to create a design that will have a personal meaning to you. Your artist can also help suggest inspirations to help create your dream design.

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